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Cyber War and Peace?

09/07/10 06:00 AM

Does the world need a peace treaty for cyberspace?

Hamadoun Toure, the Secretary General of the UN’s International Telecommunications Union, thinks so.

He’s circulating a proposal that would require countries to prevent their infrastructure from being used in a cyber attack. And signatories would have to pledge not to start a cyber-war themselves.

But what would a full-fledged conflict online look like? To find out, we talk with Roger Cressey, a senior counter-terrorism official at the National Security Council under the Clinton and Bush administrations. And we hear from Stewart Baker,  assistant director at the Department of Homeland Security Department under Bush.

But many others believe the best way to think about online security isn’t really in terms of war and peace.  We might be reading the wrong Russian author.  How about crime and punishment?

Cadet Tera Corbari, center, participates in the 9th annual Cyber Defense Exercise last week. The exercise pitted West Point Cadets against teams from the four other service academies as they designed, built and configured a computer system. During the CDX the teams defended their networks against an outside attack from National Security Agency and Dept. of Defense personnel. The teams were evaluated on their ability to defend their networks and keep their systems on-line and available. (Photo by John Pellino/DOIM MMB)

Comments | Filed Under: cyberwar Roger Cressey Stweart Baker UN

Remember the 40 hour work week?

09/06/10 06:00 AM

Today is Labor Day, our country’s only official celebration of the labor movement and the good people who brought us the 40 hour work week.

But these days, with so many technologies that connect us to our colleagues 24 hours a day and seven days a week, it’s common to receive and reply to e-mails from your boss or a client while you are sitting naked in bed.

by Remy Sharp

Author and journalist Maggie Jackson has been writing about the effect of technology on families, relationships and human mind for more than a decade. She tells us how the greatest gift we can give each other today is simply our undivided attention.

Comments | Filed Under: iphone distracted work home family

Aging Out of Employment

09/03/10 06:00 AM

The nation’s unemployment rate is out today. And as serious as those numbers are, the situation in Silicon Valley is even worse. The unemployment in the America’s high tech heartland is hovering near 11.5 percent.  While there are bidding wars erupting between Facebook and Google for young programmers. The situation for many older engineers is grim.

by Doede Boomsma

Vivek Wadwha, a visiting scholar at the School of Information at UC Berkeley, joins us to talk about the secret of Silicon Valley’s job market: It’s all about age.

Comments | Filed Under: Google Facebook unemployment Silicon Valley Age

Apple's in the Garden

09/02/10 06:00 AM

Apple is getting social. Yesterday Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs announced that his new version of iTunes will have social network built right in. It’s called Ping.

Jobs says people will use Ping to see friends’ music downloads, follow their favorite artists, and review concerts. But is Ping another way for Apple to get all of us to spend more time online and less time on the Web?

Apple is masterful at building “walled gardens” online. iTunes, the app store, and the iPad all offer simple, easy-to-understand online experiences with little hassle. Dan Ackerman, a senior editor at C-NET, says control and simplicity are part of Apple’s basic business philosophy, and that works for many consumers. But Jim Louderback, CEO of the Internet TV company Revision3, worries that creating walled-off enclaves online will ultimately harm consumers and undermine the Web’s promise of creating a truly democratic medium – where anyone can publish to the world. We talk with both about the pros and cons of walled gardens.

Comments | Filed Under: apple steve jobs ping walled garden

India's security services eye Google and Skype

09/01/10 06:00 AM

Blackberry has cut a deal with security officials in India, allowing them access e-mail and data sent using BlackBerry’s network. But the Indian government isn’t done yet. It’s now applying pressure to some other high-tech players.

Indian officials say they’re exploring ways to track the contents of conversations on Google’s video chat service and on Skype.

This spat is just the latest international dispute over internet privacy.

We speak with Fred Cate, a law professor at Indiana University who specializes in privacy and security, to understand what - if anything - security services gain when they try to mine massive amounts of information in search of terrorists.

Comments | Filed Under: India Google Skype data mining privacy security

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the Blog

Future Tense becomes Marketplace Tech Report

09/17/10 06:12 PM

Hi everyone. John Moe here. Starting Monday, September 20th, Future Tense will be going by the name Marketplace Tech Report.

Producer Larissa Anderson and I have been working closely with the folks at Marketplace ever since we took over Future Tense in May. It’s worked out great. We’ve helped them, they’ve helped us, and together we’ll find more stories you’ll want to hear. Basically, we loved Marketplace so much we married them. And kind of took their name too. Is it creepy to compare two radio shows to a married couple? Sorry about that.

As part of the Marketplace portfolio of programs (along with Marketplace, Marketplace Morning Report, and Marketplace Money), Marketplace Tech Report will keep bringing you stories that explain news and trends and technology and what it all means to you. We’ll be moving to a new simpler URL: marketplacetech.org, which will go live over the weekend. We’ll be bringing our entire archive of past shows and blog posts with us but in the meantime, we’re leaving futuretense.publicradio.org up so you can access the show archives from there as well.

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